Parkland / White Chocolate Chunk Brownies

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This week’s recipe: Brownies with Flaky Salt and White Chocolate Chunks

Each year on Passover, we read in the Haggadah that God only began to set the Israelites’ redemption in motion when they “cried out.” At this point, the Israelites had already been enslaved for nearly 200 years. There was a change in circumstances—a new pharaoh who presumably made their bitter slavery even worse—but considering that the old pharaoh decreed that all of their sons had to be thrown in the Nile, life had doubtless been no picnic. Why didn’t they cry out earlier? One suggestion is that the Israelites were not only physically but also psychologically enslaved. They were permanently defeated, in thrall to a mentality that nothing would ever change. It took a major event, the ascension of the new pharaoh, to inspire them to finally cry out and therefore take the first step in their redemption.

It’s been a week now. Parkland has joined Las Vegas, Sutherland Springs, Mother Emanuel, Orlando, Virginia Tech, Sandy Hook, Fort Hood, Aurora, San Bernadino, and Columbine in a terrible litany. And those are just the ones I remember off the top of my head. It’s been hard to hold onto hope. Five years ago felt like a tipping point, yet all that the deaths of 20 first graders led to was looser gun laws and more massacres. But it’s been a week now, and this story is still on the front page. And it’s all down to a bunch of high schoolers. Last night, one of those high schoolers got his US senator to admit, live on TV, that he is more interested in his donor’s priorities than his constituent’s lives. And they’re not alone. An entire generation is being raised with the knowledge that a gunman could come into their school at any time and take their lives and the lives of their friends. When the 9/11 attacks happened, enlistment in the military surged. These kids are being attacked in their own schools, by their own country; you don’t think they want to fight back?

You can tell from the way that the right is going after these kids that they’re a real threat. The usual deflections aren’t working this time. People are realizing that it will always be “too soon” to talk about school shootings, which have become a twice-weekly affair in our country—before an “appropriate” interval has elapsed, there will have been another shooting. It’s hard to accuse victims of exploiting themselves, though Wayne LaPierre will surely try. The purity and morality of their cause has revealed how absolutely hollow, nihilistic, and ghoulish the arguments against them are. There was that awful David Brooks column that claimed that the real problem here is that liberals keep hurting gun nuts’ feelings by looking down on their “culture.” Uh, yeah, I am going to keep looking down on any culture that has led to more American deaths in the last 50 years than all of our wars, sorry not sorry. There was a typically dickish piece from Ben Shapiro saying that we shouldn’t listen to teenagers because they act out of emotion instead of rationality. As if it’s irrational, after seeing your friends and your teachers gunned down, to want to take steps to prevent it from happening again! (I mean, God knows the NRA never makes appeals to emotion. It is perfectly logical to argue that you need multiple military-grade semi-automatic weapons to protect your home from intruders; that your arsenal of guns will successfully defeat the US military’s drones, tanks, and nukes; and that gun control is ineffective even though literally every other country that’s tried it has seen a decline in gun deaths. But I digress.) There’s the usual bullshit about how the real solution is more guns, more armed guards, more metal detectors, more and more profits flowing the gun industry’s way and who cares if the entire country turns into goddamned 1980s Beirut. And worst of all are all those accusing the students of being puppets of George Soros or crisis actors or whatever. Those people really make me feel that we are lost as a country. But the continued determination of the kids, in the face of setbacks, of lies, of character assassination, even of death threats, makes me feel hope again.

The Israelites who were redeemed from Egypt all died before they reached the Promised Land. They couldn’t believe that things would get better, and they wouldn’t work for it. Conquering the Promised Land required a new generation, one that had never known what it was to be enslaved. I hope that this is a sign that this new generation will do what we all thought was impossible. They’ve already learned the terrible lesson that nothing ever changes until you cry out.

So anyway, here are some brownies. My sister got married two weeks ago and I made these for her Shabbat Kallah, which is when your friends get together the Shabbat before the wedding and talk about how awesome you are. Obviously, such a girly event requires chocolate, and boy howdy do these brownies fit the bill. They are intensely rich and fudgy, sprinkled with sea salt to cut the sweetness and add an elegant touch.

Brownies with Flaky Salt and White Chocolate Chunks

From Downtime by Nadine Levy Redzepi

Ingredients

  • 7 oz/200g dark chocolate (minimum 60 per cent cacao, see above)
  • 1/2 cup/110g salted butter
  • 1 cup/200g sugar
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 vanilla pod (I used vanilla extract, sue me)
  • 1/2 cup/75g plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp fine sea salt
  • 3.5 oz/100g white chocolate
  • ¼ – ½ tsp flaky sea salt

Instructions

1 Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut a 9 × 16 inch strip of baking paper and use it to line the bottom and two sides of a 9 inch square tin, letting the excess paper hang over the ends. (Tip: don’t trim the paper to fit the bottom of the tin. You will need the overhang to lift the brownies out of the tin once they cool).

2 Bring about 1 inch depth of water to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Turn the heat to low so the water is barely simmering. Place a glass or metal bowl over the pan. (Note: the bottom of the bowl shouldn’t touch the simmering water. If the chocolate gets too hot, it can become grainy.

3 Coarsely chop the chocolate and put it in the bowl. As it starts to melt, cut the butter into chunks and add them to the bowl. Let them melt together, stirring occasionally. Remove the bowl from the saucepan and let the chocolate mixture cool for about 5 minutes. (Note: if the chocolate mixture is too hot, it will scramble the beaten eggs in the next step).

4 Combine the sugar and eggs in a medium bowl and beat with an electric mixer on high speed until pale and light in texture, about 2 minutes. Use the tip of a small knife to split the vanilla pod lengthwise and scrape the seeds into the egg mixture, saving the pod for another use.

5 Add the chocolate mixture and mix on low speed until thoroughly incorporated. Sift the flour, baking powder and sea salt onto the chocolate mixture and mix by hand just until combined. Coarsely chop the white chocolate into small bits and fold them into the batter. (Tip: you don’t want to overmix the batter after adding the dry ingredients or the brownies will be tough; mix just until it is a uniform dark brown).

6 Spread the batter in the prepared tin. Sprinkle with flaky salt to taste. Bake the brownies until a wooden toothpick inserted in the centre comes out with just a few moist crumbs, 25 to 30 minutes. Don’t overbake! Place the tin on a wire rack to cool completely.

7 Run a knife around the inside of the tin and lift up on the paper flaps to remove the brownie from the tin in one piece. Let the brownies cool completely before cutting into bars, and store in the refrigerator. Serve cold or at room temperature.

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Food Bloggers / Roasted Tomato and Anchovy Bucatini

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This week’s recipe: Roasted Tomato and Anchovy Bucatini

  • I was born in America but moved to Europe and immediately started incorporating British spelling and usage into my writing. I live in a sprawling mansion, but like, the old, tasteful kind. I have a large brood of remarkably well-behaved children who never reject my cooking or refuse to pose for my beautifully composed photographs. But I am the real star of these photos, with my slender figure and cute sundresses and perfectly-done makeup, selecting a ripe peach from a pile at the farmers’ market. I enjoy gathering my friends, many of whom own castles, around my rustic-looking wooden table and sharing meals where we eat freshly prepared seasonal food and drink moderate amounts of wine and laugh about how fat and cultureless Americans are.
  • Everything is AMAZING! Every recipe I make is the BEST RECIPE EVER and will CHANGE your LIFE! I have lived in the Midwest all my life, and I root for all the local sports teams. I have a husband, who is the best husband in the world, and a puppy, who is the cutest puppy in the world, and a baby, who is so silly and sweet and adorable and just makes my life complete. The About Me photo on my blog is of me jumping in the air in front of the ocean as the sun rises on the horizon. My recipes are heavy on melted cheese and desserts, except when I get on temporary health kicks and am suddenly all about green smoothies and kale salads, which by the way are DELICIOUS! Many of my posts are sponsored by Birdseye. Also, I LOVE the Instant Pot.
  • I’m a downhome country gal who loooooooves butter, golly gee! My husband and sons are just simple, rugged men who like meat and potatoes, and who like having a wife/mom who will make sure that dinner’s on the table for them when they come home from ropin’ steers! My recipes are all generically familiar to anyone with the remotest amount of cooking experience, yet their intense obviousness is rivaled only by their enormous popularity. Things might be hard but I know that Jesus and my many best-selling cookbooks and endorsement deals will see me through. And if not, there’s the fact that our giant ranch comprises 8 percent of the economy of the rural state in which I live. I am truly #blessed.
  • I’m all about clean, natural living. I used to eat things like white potatoes and non-pasture raised eggs but I was always feeling bloated and sluggish. So I tried cutting out gluten, dairy, soy, sugar, corn, legumes, grains, animal products, nightshades, FODMAPs, and anything processed or non-organic. I felt so much better and though I’ve reintroduced a few of those food groups as time has gone on, I’ve learned that I can’t digest any food that might cause me to gain weight. I live in a large, light-filled apartment in a major American city with my businessman husband, but we also have a farm property where I am photographed wearing flannel amid my free-range chickens. I make my own yogurt because the store-bought stuff is packed with harmful GMOs and artificial sweeteners. Here’s twenty photo of tonight’s dinner, artfully arranged mustard greens topped with purified oxygen.

So anyway, here’s some pasta. As soon as I saw the photo of this recipe in Dining In, I was like, damn, I need to make that. So I did, because I always follow through on my goals, as long as they involve eating pasta. (Side note: Dining In is a great cookbook that you should buy if you haven’t already. I was put off by the hipster Instagram-y photography at first, but I’ve never bookmarked so many recipes that I want to make in a single cookbook. So far I’ve made about a dozen recipes and they’ve all been excellent.) This was seriously so good, especially when paired with red wine and a viewing of Blazing Saddles. Plus, it’s just darn fun to say the word “Bucatini!” in an exaggerated Italian accent. I highly recommend it.

Roasted Tomato and Anchovy Bucatini

From Dining In

Ingredients
Kosher salt
¼ cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
½ small red onion, very thinly sliced
Crushed red pepper flakes
4 anchovy fillets
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, crushed
12 ounces bucatini or spaghetti
Lots of grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large skillet or heavy-bottomed pan over medium heat. Add the onion and season with salt and a pinch of red pepper flakes. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is totally cooked through but not browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Add the anchovies and stir until they’ve melted into the pan, about 30 seconds. Add the tomato paste and cook until it turns a brick-red color and sticks a bit to the bottom of the pan, about 90 seconds.

3. Add the tomatoes, scraping up any bits on the bottom of the skillet. Season with salt and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook, swirling the skillet occasionally, until the sauce thickens and it tastes so good you can hardly stand it. Add more salt and red pepper flakes if you want. Keep warm and set aside.

4. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in the boiling water. Drain, reserving 1 cup of the pasta cooking water.

5. Add the pasta along with ½ cup of the pasta cooking water to the skillet and toss to coat. Cook, tossing occasionally, until the pasta is really well coated, the sauce sticking to each individual noodle in a way that can only be described as perfect.

Remove the skillet from the heat and transfer the pasta to a large bowl, or divide it among four smaller bowls. Top with lots of Parmesan cheese.